Fresh Ink (2/6/15)

It’s officially February (how?) and we only have 23 short days until the shortest month bids us adieu. So I thought I’d give you a short roundup of some book news as this post is well over-due (my last Fresh Ink was back in October). Perhaps I should rename it Not-So-Fresh Ink. Anyway, hopefully you haven’t been subject to a “historic” blizzard or ice storms recently, but if you have then we’re in the same frozen boat. So just can sit back and let the news come to you.

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Here’s the news you may have missed gathered in one handy, informative place.

By Carolyn Quimby | @CarolynQuimby, @WornBookSmell

1. Harper Lee to publish her second novel–a sequel to To Kill a Mockingbird.

Photo by Flickr User ups2006 licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic.

Photo by Flickr User ups2006 licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic.

This news seems to be following the 5 stages of grief in the media. Nobody quite believed that nearly 60 years after the publication of To Kill a Mockingbird, the reclusive and famous novelist decided to publish another book, and not just any other book–but a sequel to one of the most beloved and enduring books of the century. Then the stories of Lee’s estate, mental health and memory loss began to make their way to the surface.

Suddenly the joy and disbelief every literary lover was feeling had soured–mere hours after HarperCollins released the news. In a story that I feel may become even uglier and messier than it already is, we’re somewhere between bargaining and depression. If Lee actually wants to publish this book and it gets published, I will never wish for another book release again. Until maybe Winds of Winter, but that barely counts. 

2. Literary Sweethearts

Photo by Flickr User ButterflySha licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic.

Photo by Flickr User ButterflySha licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic.

With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, Bustle published an article that reimagined book titles as Candy Hearts and I about fell over at the cute graphics. Book titles and candy hearts? Adorably literary . My favorites?

As You Like It by William Shakespeare; Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad; #GirlBoss by Sophia Amoruso; Wild by Cheryl Strayed; Yes Please by Amy Poehler; and Beyonce by Andrew Vaughan.

I think a few of us should tweet at Necco to make some Literary Sweethearts. Like a good book, they would be easily and lovingly devoured.

3. “The History of ‘Loving’ to Read”

Photo by Flickr User Susivinh  licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic.

Photo by Flickr User Susivinh licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic.

In a title seemingly influenced by Nicole Krauss’s beautiful novel, The History of Love, the New Yorker’s Joshua Rothman wrote about the evolution of “loving” to read.  What was once logical has become emotional. He also explores the sometimes opposing worlds of “book lover” and “intellectual.”

Rothman writes ” the world of books is a romantic world. Romance structures literary life,” and asks “feelings are so fundamental to literary life that it can be hard to imagine a way of relating to literature that doesn’t involve loving it. Without all those emotions, what would reading be?” As someone who enjoys both the intellectual and emotional sides of reading, I enjoyed the way the “history of loving to read” unfolded right before my very eyes.

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